Chat

Author Topic: Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant  (Read 6404 times)

Offline NARFNra

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 98
    • Email
Thought you guys might be interested in this.
The creator's channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5uzpyQ9U_2aCNpX-zpW7KQ

Offline Delek

  • Sali para ver
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • Posts: 1810
    • Delek's Website
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2015, 03:44:12 pm »
Super catchy soundtrack! Do you know the software used to do this?

Offline NARFNra

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 98
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2015, 09:47:38 pm »
Looks like a VST called GENNY.

Offline mihaelkyeah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 316
  • Learn the best from all worlds
    • YouTube channel
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2015, 02:21:05 am »
Looks like a VST called GENNY.
I've been told about GENNY before. I haven't tried it yet since I personally believe that trackers are closer to the actual chip experience - and personally I don't entirely rely on an automatic tempo transformation to the 60/50 Hz clock.
Have you used it? What are your personal thoughts on it?

Offline NARFNra

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 98
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2015, 11:45:45 pm »
I haven't tried it, but I've seen my friend use it.
In general, I think that these are less accurate; the guy made a reupload because they weren't constrained by the limitations with the tool and wanted to make a version that was (though they /did/ use GENNY again, just made sure to fix things they realized were outside of the limitations).

Basically, I feel like one's choice of tool should be dependent on what they already have experience with. Some people are very good with VST using programs, others prefer trackers... I'd say to do whatever is most comfortable for you. There's no magical reward for being perfectly accurate, but there's nothing wrong with valuing accuracy (especially if you want to play something on the system itself later) and so it depends on what you want to do.

But personally, I'm not too into VSTs. It's nice to see people can make great stuff with them, though.

Offline mihaelkyeah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 316
  • Learn the best from all worlds
    • YouTube channel
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2015, 09:19:15 pm »
I haven't tried it, but I've seen my friend use it.
In general, I think that these are less accurate; the guy made a reupload because they weren't constrained by the limitations with the tool and wanted to make a version that was (though they /did/ use GENNY again, just made sure to fix things they realized were outside of the limitations).

Basically, I feel like one's choice of tool should be dependent on what they already have experience with. Some people are very good with VST using programs, others prefer trackers... I'd say to do whatever is most comfortable for you. There's no magical reward for being perfectly accurate, but there's nothing wrong with valuing accuracy (especially if you want to play something on the system itself later) and so it depends on what you want to do.

But personally, I'm not too into VSTs. It's nice to see people can make great stuff with them, though.
To be completely honest with you, I've been much more used to use MIDI based DAWs than to use trackers. I remember when I used to happily mistake the OPM for the OPN2 and think that the SN76489 was the one that played samples instead of the sixth channel of the OPN2 chip... I used VOPM and a VSTi simply named YM2612 after the chip itself, without even knowing what kinds of hardware I was emulating and also without knowing that I was missing a PSG emulator to get a full SEGA Megadrive experience.

From what I've tried so far, and seeing how trackers are often portable and thus much more convenient for other purposes, I prefer trackers for game music since they feel closer to the actual experience. Should I suppose that actual videogame music composers developed their own software to use with the sound chip they had to work with?

Offline NARFNra

  • Jr. Member
  • Posts: 98
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2015, 03:17:21 pm »
Oh, sorry, I didn't see this. It's been months but I might as well keep up the convo.

And again, it all depends on what your personal goal is as a musician. Whatever lets you make what sounds the best, I'd say!

As for the actual video game composers bit... Well, a long time ago, it was a lot harder to produce music for systems if I recall correctly. I know that most systems had some method for making music that came with the dev kit (the sega genesis has the GEMS program, for instance). Most people had to program their own music drivers for older systems, though, which is why most NES games have totally different drivers and capabilities than each other. Neil Baldwin made some comments about this, I think... http://dutycyclegenerator.com/ (its been a while since I read this)

Offline mihaelkyeah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 316
  • Learn the best from all worlds
    • YouTube channel
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2015, 10:03:27 pm »
I think the GEMS sound tool was American – I saw it first named in Flashback: The Quest for Identity, under the special thanks credit, it said:

SEGA of America for the GEMS sound tool

I'm not aware of any perceivable differences between the European and/or Japanese Mega Drive and the American Genesis, but did they also use different software and drivers?

Offline LordHypnos

  • Member
  • Posts: 135
  • Delek FTW
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2016, 06:05:28 pm »
I think the GEMS sound tool was American – I saw it first named in Flashback: The Quest for Identity, under the special thanks credit, it said:

SEGA of America for the GEMS sound tool

I'm not aware of any perceivable differences between the European and/or Japanese Mega Drive and the American Genesis, but did they also use different software and drivers?
Here is a list of different games and what sound drivers they used: http://gdri.smspower.org/wiki/index.php/Mega_Drive/Genesis_Sound_Engine_List
Looks like Sega of Japan had a driver called SMPS that was used a lot , but also a lot of software developers (including some that had awesome music like Technosoft, Zyrinx, and Konami) had their own custom drivers.

Offline mihaelkyeah

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 316
  • Learn the best from all worlds
    • YouTube channel
    • Email
Dune Cougar/Mega Dune Cougar: New Sega Genesis OST by Gallium Grant
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2016, 12:55:37 am »
Yes, after a little research I had found that page as well. I honestly believe the SMPS driver is a bit overrated, or at least it wasn't given as good of a use as it could have been, seeing most soundtracks with the special Channel 3 Mode were made with it. If I had to choose my own personal favourites, I would pick the one used in the FIFA series, Kevin Pickell's driver for EA, and the Krisalis driver by Shaun Hollingworth.

GEMS can sound really good when it's well used, a lot of people love to say "it sucks" but a fair amount of Disney games use it, Flashback uses it, Earthworm Jim uses it, Vectorman does as well... If I had to choose my most hated one, that'd be Steve Hayes' EA driver used in ungodly loud and annoying soundtracks and sound designs such as Lotus Turbo Challenge, EA's port of Marble Madness and Rolo to the Rescue. Then again, I might have not listened to the best examples.